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Kitchen Planning Articles:

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A new kitchen represents a big investment for most people and they rightly expect to use it happily

One of the most important factors for a successful kitchen is space: there can never be enough and everybody will no doubt know the feeling of not being able to fit everything in. But it’s not only the size of the room that determines whether you have a good space, but also whether the room is divided into practical areas and whether a consistent plan has been devised which sees the available floor space being used for furniture, provides sufficient room to move about between the units, and ensures adequate storage space is provided, ideally in the form of generous larder units, for keeping food and dishes.


With the prices per square metre for homes being what they are today, such considerations are more important than ever, because clever utilisation of space can save money which can come in very handy later on when it comes to fitting out your kitchen.

Wrong:

  • Poorly arranged doors can be a real handicap.
  • The space behind the door is too small to fit cupboards in; the pivoting radius of the door leaf may be an obstacle.
  • A radiator is blocking the entire space underneath the window, which is urgently needed as a work surface.
  • The low sill height is preventing an ergonomically sound working height from being achieved, so you always have to bend over quite a lot to do anything and then complain of backache.

It’s better to sort these issues out from the off:

  • The door is built into the wall in such a way that there is still sufficient room to store items in larder units, for example. If necessary, swap a hinged door for a sliding door; this will create much more scope.
  • You could replace the radiator with a model that would not obstruct your new or modified kitchen, or you could move the radiator so it would not impinge on any work/storage surfaces.
  • A sufficiently high sill or a modified window with a fixed unit beneath it would enable you to create a work surface at a good ergonomic height.

The aim is to design a kitchen that makes optimum use of the space available and creates an area for furniture which the kitchen user is happy with. The Arbeitsgemeinschaft Die Moderne Küche (Modern Kitchen Consortium) recommends that a four-person household has a floor surface area of seven square metres. See our list of questions for more advice on optimum use of space.