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Snapdragons: what's in a name?

You feel that dragons of every sort ought to have a place in a child's garden. But this plant is really brilliant in more ways than one.

First of all they're easy to grow and not too fussy about soil types and growing conditions. They come in a wonderful range of colours – from white through yellows and pinks to the richest magenta. Then there's the shape of the flower, a child can poke a small finger in between the upper and lower petals and – what a thrill – get 'snapped' at by the dragon plant.

Bees love snapdragons too

With their huge range of shapes and colours, there's no doubt snapdragons deserve a place in your garden. There are low-growing types that are no more than 20 centimetres high and tall plants that grow up to a metre in very fertile soil. In addition to the wide range of colours, you can also find two-colour snapdragons. They will flower from early summer into early autumn. And children will love watching how bees and bumblebees push their way into the depths of the flower.

Source: Anne Staeves, www.aid.de